Archive for the ‘boomers’ Tag

New Year’s Resolution – Day 2

New Years Resolution- Day 2
Halaluah!  Any one doubting the presence of a great being didn’t step on the scale with me today….. 169 lbs!   Okay, so I am trying to figure out how I could have lost so much weight.
I figure the fitness staff are deliberately playing a trick on us fitness bluffs and lower the weights by a couple of pounds. Or 2. the hormones really make that much of a difference.
Last night I watched the 650 lb virgin and thought wow and I am fussing about 30 lbs.  However those 30 lbs jumped on board since my wedding and at that rate I would be homeless in 2 years. My new husband has always said he doesn’t mind if I get really overweight ….except where am I going to live.
So Last night if it wasn’t for this blog that I had written yesterday I would have cheated. 3 Times I went into the kitchen and if I had not written that I would not eat after 7:00 …man I could have satisfied the munchies. I was a good  and was rewarded by “losing 3 lbs”  I am still looking for them and will probably find them tomorrow when I step on the scale again.
I have taken my vitamin pills, and exercised for 5 days in 7  so I have kept my resolutions so far.
I went to the bank and starting on Monday I will be hiring a bookkeeper for my new business so then I will see how easy it will be for me to stay on track with my 10,000 in the Black resolution.

THINK LIKE THE 60s’ IN YOUR 60s’

By Michael Sullivan (A Rebel with a Cause)

For the past three years I have been consumed by the wonder as well as the trials and tribulations of the issues related to aging, with a particular focus on the issues for those age 60 and above.  Fostered by the influx of magazine articles, television specials, the experiences of friends, family and myself, it is a constant “in your face” issue and a personal challenge for many of us.

I will be sharing both my opinions and some facts I have gleaned from my research and interviews. I realize it is impossible to generalize about everyone, and if my views don’t apply to you, no problem just hit delete or disregard them.  If you are already satisfied with your perspective and personal realities relative to aging this article may reinforce your perspectives or may be utilized to inspire a loved one to address their issues related to aging.

I began my journey by trying to understand and control my frustration with the intellectual disconnect related to what I call the ‘HUMAN NATURE SYNDROME’ and how it keeps us from being the best that we can be, especially as we age in our 60s’ and beyond.  It is absolutely amazing to me that so many of us are not happy and healthy especially in our later years, despite the fact that everything we need to know and do to lead happy and healthy lives has been documented and published for eons

In their book “The Power Years,” Ken Dychtwald and Daniel Kadlec write:

“As we look downstream at retirement and old age, we don’t like what we see. We’re noticing that for the majority of today’s older adults, the retirement dream is proving to be an unhappy and diminished period of life that is too often characterized by social isolation, loneliness, inertia, a sense of personal diminishment, and financial dependency.”

We have all heard or read the “right things” to do to age well until we are ready to scream and yet we don’t embrace them.  For instance, we don’t: eat right, exercise enough, reduce stress, stop smoking etc, etc, etc.  I know aging brings with it physical and mental realities (I am 62) but the degree to which many of us do nothing to address them or in fact accelerate them is simply beyond belief.  What part of our own human nature allows us to not love ourselves enough to do what we know is best for us?  Best for us not based on opinion but on fact.  Think about it as it applies to you and those things you are not doing that will help you lead a better life as you age.  If anyone finds a “cure” for this ‘HUMAN NATURE SYNDROME’ they will become a billionaire.

I don’t propose to have a cure, but perhaps a perspective and context that will help you look at how you are aging and inspire you to do what is necessary for you to be the best you can be at 60 and beyond.

We all need to focus on our health and fitness regardless of our age and especially as we approach our 50s and beyond.   However, I have focused on our 60s’ because it is my belief that in general (especially in light of the current economic situation and its impact on our net worth) our 60s’ offers us the first opportunity to truly rebalance our lives between vocation, avocation, financial needs, having fun and most importantly taking care of ourselves.  Our 60s’ represent the tipping point and bridge to the rest of our lives.  I also believe that no other decade has as protracted an impact on our lives as our 60s’. The decisions we make relative to rebalancing the key components (health, financial, spiritual, vocational, etc.) of life in our 60s’ will have a profound and in some cases irreversible affect on the quality of the remainder of our lives. So, how are we to more effectively manage how we age? Well, here it is.

MY PREMISE:

  1. Apply the attitude of the 1960s’ to your 60s’
  2. Make Your Physical Fitness/Health a daily priority
  3. Identify and address the real core reason(s) why physical fitness is not a priority to you

THE 60s’ IN YOUR 60s’

We need to apply the “attitude of the 1960s” when we challenged everything and challenge all the current myths and misplaced beliefs related to aging especially from one’s 60s’ and beyond. For example, challenge the following:

  • That it is normal to have aches and pains;
  • Sex and intimacy is not as important anymore;
  • A pill is necessary to perform (allowing exceptions that apply for medical reasons);
  • Exercising 30 minutes a day will get you fit;
  • Can’t participate in more adventurous activities;
  • Guaranteed loss of energy

In many cases these myths and beliefs are “sold” to us by pundits and companies with profit motives. These myths and misplaced beliefs become a reality only if we allow them to do so.

Some of us believe the manner in which we age and the issues we face are predetermined by our genes.  However according to Dr. Steven Cherniskie, PhD, only 35% or our longevity is determined by our genetic makeup.  So, two-thirds of our life span is under our control.  And if you are at genetic risk, isn’t that all the more reason to prioritize addressing your health related issues? How we age and how we feel about aging, therefore, is up to us.

MAKE YOUR PHYSICAL FITNESS A DAILY PRIORITY

I know what you are thinking —If one more person tells me to exercise, two things are going to happen—-first, I am going to scream and second, I’m going to shoot them.  Well get ready and hold your thoughts of shooting me until you finish the article.  And as I stated earlier, if you don’t agree with me—no problem, just ignore me and you won’t have a felony conviction on your record.

What do I mean by physical fitness? I mean, that through a minimum of one hour of daily exercise and good nutrition you achieve a balance between endurance, strength, flexibility, energy level, balance and body weight.   It is different for everyone but you will know what is right for you—you will simply ‘feel’ the impact of your choices; you will feel great!  There are thousands of educational and fitness resources available to you to determine your needs and the best plan to address them.  I know we also need to have mental, spiritual, emotional, and sexual health, for they are all interrelated, but I believe physical fitness is the linchpin.  So, unless you are the best multi-tasker in the world, fitness is the best initial place to focus our time and energy as we rebalance our lives in our 60s’ and beyond.  Jack LaLane in a recent interview in the Men’s Journal said it well—“Exercise is king.  Nutrition is queen. Put them together, and you’ve got a kingdom.”

When you ask people what is most important to them, a great majority say their health.  From that point on it gets very complicated, especially when one tries to keep the approach for staying healthy simple, realistic, implementable and relative to the ‘Human Nature Syndrome’, that I mentioned earlier, sustainable.  To most of the folks I speak with, health to them means freedom from major illnesses such as Cancer, Heart Disease, Diabetes and Dementia in their later years.  But why not feel as healthy as you can, all the time, by being fit; and, in so doing, help prevent the possible onslaught of one or all of these diseases?  While it sounds reasonable, logical, practical and achievable, most of us don’t make it our priority.

Let’s talk some more about why we should make physical fitness a daily priority.  I’ll throw in some hard data (add the quote noted above by Dychtwald and Kadlec), and, hopefully, put my perspective in a context that, not only makes sense to you, but will inspire you to act accordingly.

As I visited various retirement communities I reviewed the questionnaires they gave to prospects to determine their lifestyle needs and priorities.  The following are the areas that were identified:

Personal Health                                            Social Companionship

Staying Physically Active                            Opportunities to do new Things

Cost and Access of Health Care                   Finances

Wellness Programs                                       Driving

Remaining Independent                                Travel

Security                                                         Healthy Energy Level

As I studied them, I pondered what common thread connects them. And from my evaluation, it is clearly Physical Fitness.  Physical Fitness has a direct and significant impact on every one of the needs noted.  It poses a different context in which one could view the critical importance of our physical fitness and hopefully outweigh, in our minds, the reason(s) we don’t address our fitness needs.

There are numerous daily reports relative to healthcare and physical fitness that share the projected negative impact of not engaging in physical activity on all of us, but with profound emphasis for those of us in our later years.  Here are just a significant few, what I call “Macro” factors, relative to the importance of physical fitness and good health.

  • Research has shown that seniors can expect Medicare to cover only about half of their medical expenses, on average.  According to Fidelity Investments, the average senior retiring at age 65 this year will need $240,000 to pay the out-of-pocket costs of healthcare for the rest of his or her life.
  • Thirty states currently have laws making adult children responsible for their parents, if their parents can’t afford to take care of themselves.  While these laws are rarely enforced, there has been speculation that states may begin dusting them off, as a way to save on Medicaid expenses, according to SeniorJournal.com.
  • According to Dr. Andrew Weil, less than 5% of the US population will be born with a defective gene. That means over 95% of us have some say in how we age.  Most diseases can be attributable to lifestyle choices, not old age.
  • According to the department of Health & Human Services 50% of all medical costs are attributable to preventable illnesses.
  • The financial health of Medicare is in dire straits and the projected overall cost for health care could bankrupt our country. We simply cannot rely solely on our government to provide for us. If we do we could literally wind up dead before our time.
  • New technology that will effectively treat the major diseases will continue to evolve but if you are not in good physical condition you may not be around to utilize them, or be a suitable candidate.  And depending upon the “system” that the current Administration implements, you may have to wait months before getting access to major medical treatments.

So, when you combine both the individual and personal needs, with the more “Macro” factors (and there are more) noted above, why would you not do what is best for you and focus on your fitness and health?  Perhaps this information and perspective will inspire you to do so.

IDENTIFY AND ADDRESS THE REAL CORE REASONS WHY PHYSICAL FITNESS IS NOT A PRIORITY TO YOU.

This topic is too complex for the scope of this article but I will share some salient thoughts with you based on my readings and discussions with older folks.

Whether it is from a medical, psychological, or uniquely personal perspective, I know there are numerous reasons why we don’t do what is best for us. However, that doesn’t justify the degree to which many of us do nothing, or not enough for our well-being, knowing the profound effect it has on us and those that love us.

I hear people say, “I don’t like to exercise”.  Well, I am not here to sell you on why you should, but rather to provide a perspective that may help you view exercise and fitness differently.  Many of us don’t like our jobs and can come up with a lot of reasons why we don’t.  But we face and manage REALITY.  We need to work to survive and give ourselves a chance to be the best we can be.  Some of us need to approach fitness and our overall health in the same context—that it is simply not an option.

The reasons we don’t exercise and maximize our health are many and often are related to issues deep within us.  But whatever they are, and however many you have– view them as WEEDS, in your garden of life. PULL YOUR WEEDS AND WATER YOUR SEEDS. The weeds block the sun, hinder your happiness, cloud your perspective, rob you of growth, and steal your energy.  Some even have thorns that deter us from even considering the task of pulling them.  Water your seeds of growth by exercising and focusing on what we all say is our number one concern—our health.

It all gets back to my earlier statement that ‘we need to love ourselves enough to do what we need to do, to be the best we can be’ My colleague and fellow Rebel with a Cause, Charly (no e) Heavenrich, in his book Dancing on the Edge, addresses this issue eloquently through the teachings of an Indian medicine women named Spirit Dancer.  Spirit Dancer guides him (as he runs the rapids in the Grand Canyon) on his path to introspection, awareness and the willingness to “jump off the edge” in order to address the difficult issues we all face in life, including our fitness and health.  This book has had a profound effect on me and my attitude towards fitness, health, life and aging—it may do the same for you. (No, I do not get a sales commission)

My goal when I started this article was to share some of my opinions and hard facts with the intention of creating a perspective and context that would help you view exercise and fitness in a manner that would inspire you to make them a daily priority as you age in your 60s’ and beyond.  And in summary, here is my final shot—

  • Many of us say our Health is our number one concern—we need to act accordingly.
  • Fitness is the common thread between the personal needs noted above, by seniors as they continue to age.
  • The current and future impact of the “Macro” issues and ongoing medical and political trends, demand that we take more control and accountability for our own health and fitness.
  • Money! By being fit we reduce the chances that we will need procedures that increase the cost of our insurance, cost of medications, deductibles and co-pays.  Money is usually a great motivator– make it one of yours.
  • No one can do it for us—only we can exercise and stay fit.
  • If you don’t exercise, seek the root cause (s) and remove it as an obstacle (s)
  • The need for fitness and exercise is as much a reality as the need for work and food.
  • Do it because you love yourself.

Don’t give into the Human Nature Syndrome.  Give good health and fitness to yourself and to those you love and who love you.  Others have done it and you can do it as well or better.  Join me—Be a Rebel with a Cause—the best cause of all— YOU.

RX for Savings

When I started to think about my parents’ retirement, I was overwhelmed by the thoughts of all the “things that needed to be done should something go wrong”.  I was a single mom working full-time and I thought “time is not my friend in this” and set up a company to help my parents.  My parents oblivious to my obvious concern for their life and health and the piles of stuff accumulated proceeded to act as any snowbirds do and purchased a place in the sun.  Their annual trek to Lah-Lah land, as my mom puts it, was one of no worries, and be “happys”.  They were healthy and financially able to finance their simple needs and even could satisfy their wants occasionally.

Last year 2 things happened that brought home the reality of living 6 months in a different country than your own …both of them had medical issues.  Mom, who is 77 and a nurse, knew she had an infection and needed medication. They when to a clinic and $400.00 dollars later had the diagnosis “infection” and a prescription in hand and needed to shell out a further $385.00 for the medication.  She asked me to mail her prescription. I did it cost 10.00 to mail and their health plan covered the cost of the medication.  She saved $375.00.

Later that same year, Dad who is 80 and still the only handyman that my mom trusts, replaced the white broadloom throughout the Florida home and put in laminate.  It looked beautiful ….but Dad’s health paid the price.  In severe pain from being on his knees all day, he discovered that his medical insurance had run out.  Painfully, he got into his car and drove the two days back to Canada in the dead of winter to reapply for his insurance and to see his doctor about the problem that he was having. The doctor immediately diagnosed the problem, but said the medication that works the best was only available in the states.  He could give him a sample but he would have to fill the prescription in the states, as it hadn’t been approved by the Canadian Health Protection Branch yet.  That medication brought relief for the first time in several weeks.

So, owning a business to help seniors find the help they needed, I saw a real opportunity to make a difference.  My thoughts were to find a company that could fill prescriptions in Canada, and could also provide medication that was only available in the states.  I began my search and being for my own parents I did my due diligence in finding a safe alternative to the high cost of buying medication in the states.

The FDA encourages online prescriptions purchases and published their tips to finding a good online source which is:

  • Make sure the site requires a prescription and has a pharmacist available for questions.
  • Buy only from licensed pharmacies.
  • Don’t provide personal information such as credit card numbers unless you are sure the site will protect them. That they will not sell contact information

It was with those tips in mind I began a search for a licensed pharmacy that complied with those guidelines. For my Dad’s situation I found a US pharmacy that is licensed and provides US Brands and US Generics located in Lakeland Florida.  They partnered with a Canadian pharmacy which is located in Alberta, Canada called Extended Care Pharmacy license no. #1636. This pharmacy is owned by a pharmacist, Andy Troszok, the first president of the Canadian International Pharmacy Association, who is a pioneer and advocate for low cost importations of prescription drugs to US Citizens.  I told my parents that by faxing their prescription to Extendicare Pharmacy they would be ordering the drugs directly from Canada.  They would pay only the shipping and pharmacy fee but their medication would be covered by OHIP. Any medication that is only available in the states would be provided by their US counterpart in Lakeland Florida and that wouldn’t be covered but would be available to them with a prescription. They loved the idea and told me I should include this information on my website, knowing that I would never sell contact information as I set the company up to protect seniors.  They were wondering if their American friends in Florida could take advantage of the link that I created.  I researched the process online and realized that the American Drug Companies were protecting their huge profit margins by scaring the general public into believing medication from Canada was “fake” and they continued their propaganda campaign by painting all foreign pharmacies with the same brush.

I was at a party in Florida to celebrate my friend’s victory over Cancer and spoke to her about her medication. She had already done a lot of online searching to discover a pharmacy that could provide her with her medication. That said, her friends were warning her of medications from Canadian pharmacies.  Canada is not a third world country, but protected by more restrictive rules about medication then in the states.  However, because of our public health insurance, it is simply a country that legislated that Pharmaceutical companies were only allowed to charge so much. Lipitor is Lipitor period.  A licensed pharmacy would lose their license if they tried to pass off “fake” drugs.  This would be evident quickly from complaints.

My thoughts were confirmed when the Governor of Minnesota, Tim Pawlenty visited Canada and established a website providing information to Americans on how to import safety.  I decided to create a link on my website so that Americans can exercise their rights as free citizens to make their own choices. It’s up to you now. However, the following state Governments are using Canadian Pharmacies to lower the cost of running their states, why shouldn’t you? What do they know that you should too?

MINNESOTA, NEVADA, ILLINOIS, KANSAS, MISSOURI, VERMONT, RHODE ISLAND, WISCOUSIN, MAINE.

Seniors Going Green

Written by Jessica from Find Help 4 Seniors

Seniors, as a growing segment of the population have more opportunity than ever to lead the fight for a greener future. They have witnessed the major environmental initiatives in the past and their wealth of experience is something that everyone can learn from. During World War 2, today’s seniors were learning to conserve and reuse materials. Widespread recycling of paper and kitchen fats began for use in the war. The Sixties and Seventies brought about the realization of the need to save energy. The search was on for new sources of cleaner energy such as nuclear, solar and tidal. As the environmental movement has grown, seniors have been there every step of the way.

Today’s seniors are continuing the environmental drive. Environmental action groups such as Green Seniors are helping seniors join together with the goal of sustainability and preservation of the environment. Seniors are increasingly buying eco-friendly products and bringing back conservation methods learned in the Depression. Recycling programs have sprung up in many retirement communities where seniors are concerned about leaving a clean environment for their grandchildren. Some retirement homes are even catering specifically to the environment-conscious senior.

In order to save our environment, everyone has to work together. Grandparents can pass knowledge and conservation techniques on to their grandchildren. Re-dye clothing to get extended use from it, open curtains to let natural light in and make one trip to get lots of things done. If you are the child or grandchild of a senior, begin asking about their experiences. If you are a senior, please post your own tips and tricks in response to this blog!

Dementia Research

written by Chloe Hamilton of Warm Embrace Elder Care

North American society places great value on independence and autonomy. These values are instilled at a young age and persist throughout life. One of the hallmarks of successful independence is the ability to remain living in one’s own home, creating a societal trend toward living in the community and not in a facility during the entire aging process.

Aging can take many forms and is a unique experience for each individual. Aging at home is preferable for many seniors, regardless of health or ability. While dementia is not an inevitable part of aging, it is an illness that does afflict some seniors and drastically influences their experience in living in the community.

The increasing trend towards independent living, combined with the rapidly aging population is focusing current research on the experience of living with dementia. Dr. Lorna DeWitt, is one such researcher whose doctoral thesis (at McMaster University) is based on qualitative research of people who live alone in the community with dementia. Her work is more detailed than a mere survey of family members; she asks probing questions of the dementia sufferers themselves. Due to the sensitive nature of the questions she asks, she struggled to find suitable and willing study participants.

Dr. DeWitt focused on individual interviews with dementia sufferers to gain a better sense of how those individuals feel. She found that her participants wanted to hold onto the “now” without thinking about the future, if possible. When asked about their plans for the future, many participants admitted that eventually they would not be able to remain alone, but they quickly focused to how they were managing to cope in the present.

They described their homes or apartments as “dead space” without the infused life of the television. For many of her participants, their connection to the outside world was predominantly through watching television or looking out the window to watch community activity.

The participants communicated their desire that others understand the importance of including the dementia sufferer in any decision making. Retaining a sense of control and independence is crucial, and is often the primary motivation behind living in the community rather than in a facility. Decisions about daily living and routine, such as bedtime, what to wear, or which program to watch on television, grant the individual a sense of control over their environment.

Although dementia sufferers may not be able to weigh the pros and cons of more serious decisions, they still need to be included in the process. The feeling of involvement often results in a more receptive response to change whereas imposed change without warning can result in resentment and hostility.

The participants responded that one of their greatest challenges is hiding the disease of dementia. Admitting the diagnosis of dementia to others makes one quite vulnerable, and asking for help can be overwhelming. Sadly, this can isolate dementia sufferers who reduce their social connections in an attempt to keep their illness unknown. Fear of the unknown intensifies as one worries about others discovering their illness and further removing any independence that the individual has retained.

The societal value of independence does not disappear when one is diagnosed with dementia; instead, it alters the form of independence that one may experience.  Retaining independence and a sense of control over environment is still vital to one’s happiness and well-being.

Toasted or Plain?

Written by Chloe Hamilton of Warm Embrace Elderly Care

You’re sitting in the doctor’s waiting room, watching the clock, waiting for your mother’s medical tests to finally be over.  Mentally you’re calculating whether you have enough time to drive your mother home, pick up some groceries, and cook dinner for your teens…or will you be ordering pizza yet again tonight?

If this scene feels at all familiar to you, then you’re likely one of the 712,000 Canadians who fit into the infamous “sandwich generation”.  The sandwich generation generally applies to those in their 40’s to 60’s who are simultaneously caring for their aging parents as well as their growing children.  The term “sandwich generation” was coined in 1981 by the demographer Dorothy Miller, but it has really only come to the forefront in recent years as increasing portions of the population are affected by the crunch of multi-generational caregiving.

Advances in healthcare are allowing people to live longer lives, though not necessarily healthier lives.  The end of one’s life may include more intensive care years, further demanding the time and energy of the sandwich generation who is caught between their parents and children.  The increased life expectancy has led to another possibility—the club sandwich generation (or double-decker sandwich).  The club sandwich refers to people who are assisting their aging parents, while also being involved in their children’s, and grandchildren’s lives.  Four living generations is no longer a rare scenario.

It is now possible for families to have two generations who are both in their senior years at the same time!  The club sandwich can also apply to someone who is in her 40’s who has teenagers at home, while also assisting her 68 year old parents and her 89 and 92 year old grandparents.  A woman in this situation is caring for two senior generations simultaneously, while also raising her own family.

Add to this the pressures of work, marriage, personal life, volunteer commitments, and personal health—no wonder there is concern about the sandwich generation suffering burn-out!  Often people feel that they should be able to manage all of the simultaneous caregiving because previous generations managed to do so.  In reality, previous generations did not experience the sandwich generation phenomenon to the same degree, and they certainly did not have club sandwiches!  Recognizing the unique challenges faced by today’s sandwich generation will help to alleviate guilt and replace the sense of “I should be able to do this” with “where can I find meaningful assistance?”.

Acknowledging that you cannot do it all alone and that you deserve assistance is the first step.  Caring for your own health and well-being is crucial, or you risk injury and illness to yourself.  Managing to eat healthy meals, and getting exercise needs to be a personal priority, not just something to do if you have time left over—because there is never time left over.  Accept enough assistance so that you are able to lead a balanced lifestyle that cares for both you and your loved ones.

Then, with support systems set in place, you can avoid being toasted, and enjoy as many of your “sandwich” years as possible!

Vascular Dementia

Written by Chloe Hamilton of Warm Embrace Elder Care

How is your vascular health? That’s probably not a question that you’re frequently asked, and yet the impact of your vascular health is enormous. Did you know that caring for your vascular health could prevent dementia?

Dementia is a broad term that is comprised of many sub-types of dementias, one of which is Alzheimer’s Disease.  Less well-known than Alzheimer’s is Vascular Dementia (VaD).  VaD is a disease of the small blood vessels of the brain.

If the large blood vessels in the brain become blocked, the patient suffers a recognizable stroke.  The small blood vessels in the brain are also crucial, though a blockage may not result in a visible stroke.  Instead, the patient may suffer a series of transient ischemic attacks (TIA), which are like “mini strokes”.  These strokes may go entirely unnoticed, especially if they occur at the front of the brain. Even an initial CT scan often does not show any evidence of a stroke within the first 24 hours—only an MRI can show the results of a stroke within minutes of it occurring.

These mini-strokes may be silent, but they are still causing irreparable damage to the brain, increasing the risk for dementia.  In a study conducted by the Neuropathology Group MRC, 78% of dementia cases showed evidence of small vessel disease.  Every minute in North America an overt stroke is occurring, and there are an estimated 10-20x more silent mini-strokes than there are overt strokes. Vascular Dementia tends to affect men more than women, though the disparity between men and women is closing in as increasing numbers of women are being affected by heart disease and stroke.

The risk factors for VaD are the same as the risk factors for heart disease and stroke, so by reducing or eliminating your heart disease risk factors, you may also be preventing Vascular Dementia.  The most prevalent risk factor for both VaD and stroke is hypertension—a silent disease that affects the majority of our aging population.  Hypertension initially appears unimportant, but it flourishes on unhealthy lifestyles that tend to include too much sugar, fat, salt, and not enough exercise.

Hypertension, paired with elevated cholesterol, diabetes, smoking, age, and history of stroke/TIA are all serious risk factors.  People do not have control over some risk factors, such as age—we only wish we could control that factor! Other risk factors can be eliminated entirely—such as smoking.  While hypertension and diabetes may not be entirely eliminated in all cases, they can be reduced and managed effectively. Increasing physical activity to 30 minutes of aerobic exercise three times weekly has a positive influence on the brain and can assist in countering other risk factors for both dementia and heart disease.

Since you personally are capable of controlling most of your risk factors, you have the power to prevent VaD.  How is your vascular health now?

PROTECT YOURSELF FROM SCAMS & FRAUDS

Scams and frauds are the number one crime against seniors. Education is your best protection against unscrupulous scam artists and fraudsters. These are some of the most commonly perpetrated scams and frauds against seniors. Don’t fall prey.


Door-to Door Scams: Scam artists will use high pressure tactics and try to get you to sign quickly – too quickly. Making a purchase from a door-to-door sales person is not your best option. If you ask a salesperson to leave your home and they refuse, call the police. Don’t sign anything in haste even if it is a product or service that you are interested in and seems to be a great deal.


Home Improvement Offers: A favourite ploy of fraudsters is to offer you any number of home improvements, saying that they are working in the area and have excess material so that they can offer you a great price. Never hire a contractor unless you have estimates and quotes in writing from at least three different companies. Ask for references and call them. Never buy from someone that gives you just a first name and cell phone number. Or that asks for money up front.


You Are a Winner: If you have really won a contest it will not cost you any money to retrieve your prize. NEVER send money for shipping, handling, or processing. Further it doesn’t matter how old you are, What is the family income in order to claim a prize. You never have to pick up a prize it will be sent to you.


Bank Inspector Needs Your Help: A phony bank inspector contacts you and asks for your help in catching a dishonest bank employee. These scams all involve you withdrawing money from your bank account that you will never see again.


Online Scams: Beware of emails that appear to be from your financial institution wanting to verify your account information. Financial institutions NEVER ask to verify your information via email. If you are making purchases online make sure that the websites are reputable.


How can you protect yourself?

  • FINDHELP4SENIORS has created the senior-friendly logo to protect you from unscrupulous scam artists. Look for it, if you don’t see it ask why not!

  • If you want Find Help 4 seniors to poll for consumer reviews please contact them online.

  • Never give out your credit card number, social insurance number, PIN number, or bank account numbers to anyone that you do not know.

  • When using an ABM or your debit card, protect your PIN number.

  • Never sign a contract until you and your lawyer, or other expert has thoroughly read it.

  • Never buy anything over the phone.

  • Never send cash.

  • Don’t give out personal information.

  • Don’t tell anyone that you live alone.

  • If it sounds too good to be true, it generally is.

  • Shred bank statements, credit card statements, and utility statements.

  • Report suspicious offers to the police.

  • Check the caller id and Google the number if it is a scam Google will have a record of it.

  • Register to the Do Not Call list. If they call tell them you are registered and please take you off their list. If they call again threaten legal action. The threat alone is enough of a scare tactic

TOO YOUNG TO RETIRE. TOO OLD TO HIRE.

Written By: Jennifer Rallis

Co-Author of Ugly Resumes Get Jobs and Other Fishing Lessons (www.uglyresumes.com)

The 21st Century was supposed to usher in a wave of retiring Baby Boomers who would live off the spoils of their retirement funds traveling to sunny destinations, playing golf and enjoying time with their grandchildren. The reality of 2009 has many Baby Boomers reconsidering this vision of their future! Some Baby Boomers who feel that they are in the prime of their careers and too young retire, have postponed leaving the labor force for several more years. While other retiree-wanna be’s are forced to continue working because current economic circumstances have depleted their retirement savings, depreciated their home value and raised the cost of living, leaving them without the necessary funds to retire.

Whatever their reason for staying in the labor market, many Baby Boomers claim age discrimination when it comes time to look for a new job. This is a difficult claim to refute when you look at the results of a recent US Labor Statistics Report. Although the rate of unemployment for Baby Boomers is lower than the national average of 8.9%, when unemployment hits this group it lasts longer than any other demographic; 22 weeks on average. And as the recession deepens it is predicted that this time period will be even longer.

The good news for Baby Boomers is that there are simple things that they can do to ward off age discrimination and land their next great job. No plastic surgery or hair dye required!

  1. Ageless Thinking

If you believe that your age is an issue, then it will be issue! Focus your energy on selling your skills and experience to potential employers, not on defending your age.

  1. Think Healthy

The only time you should divulge health conditions during an interview is if good physical health is a requirement for a job. If you have had previous health problems, heart attack, diabetes, cancer, etc, do not volunteer this information to a potential employer.

  1. Have a technology friendly Ugly Resume

In a sea of thousands of other applicants, you must have a technology friendly resume that can be found and entices hiring managers to call you. Younger applicants would never mail a typed resume to a potential employer, nor should you.

  1. Make your Ugly Resume Ageless

Do not include your birth date, graduation date or more than 15 years of experience on your resume. Do not list out-dated software, hardware or systems experience. Listing out-dated technical skills paints a picture of an out-dated job seeker.

  1. Be Selective

Only apply for jobs that you are qualified for. Do not apply for jobs that you are either over-qualified or under-qualified for. You will set yourself up for rejection and disappointment.

  1. Use Technology

When applying for a job, apply online or email the potential employer directly. These simple actions indicate to a potential employer that you have the basic technical aptitude needed to do most jobs.

  1. Have an Ageless Interview

During an interview, sell the benefits of “you” to a potential employer. Do not spend the interview defending your age or trying to convince the interviewer that you have the health and stamina to do the job! Younger job seekers would never mention these points, nor should you.

  1. Build a Bridge

When interviewing with a younger hiring manager, do not intimidate him or her with your age and experience. Do not make statements such as: “when you were in diapers, I was managing a team of 30 people” or “the work ethic from my generation is much better than your generation”. You need to make this person comfortable with you and make them feel that they can manage you without any problems.

  1. Don’t answer any direct questions about your age.

It is illegal for employers to ask direct questions about your age during an interview. If a potential employer asks you how old you are, don’t answer the question; rather answer the intent behind the question.

  1. Sell Your Lifestyle

Older job seekers offer employers many benefits over their younger counter-parts such as: years of proven experience, expertise, seasoned judgment and lack of family responsibilities (small children) that may interfere with job performance. Sell these features of you during an interview!

If you have experienced age discrimination during an interview, don’t get discourage! Find another opening, apply and move on. There are plenty of employers who value older workers. Remember, you have worked too hard in your life to end up in a job where you are not valued.

For more tips on how to successfully land your next great job, see Ugly Resumes Get Jobs and Other Fishing Lessons (www.uglyresumes.com).

THE IMPORTANCE OF STAYING ACTIVE

Seniors can and should remain healthy, active, vital, independent, and sexy. These qualities are ageless. In fact seniors who live an active lifestyle – are physically active, exercise regularly, and participate in leisure activities – can help to prevent or delay many diseases and disabilities.

According to the Public Health Agency of Canada:

* 60% of older adults are inactive.
* Sitting or lying for long periods is a serious health risk.
* Inactivity leads to declines in bone strength, muscle strength, heart and lung fitness, and flexibility.
* Inactivity is as harmful to your health as smoking.

The one thing that most seniors fear is giving up their independence, yet the numbers of seniors who are inactive is alarming. Mobility is essential for independent living – bending, carrying, and lifting are necessary in the course of everyday living. It’s never too late to get active. In a recent study by the Buck Institute, Simon Melov, PhD, and Mark Tarnopolsky, MD, PhD, of McMaster University Medical Center in Hamilton, Ontario, found that exercise, particularly resistance training, actually rejuvenates muscle tissue in healthy senior citizens.

Start today. Keep as active as possible. Just 30 minutes of physical activity a day will improve your health and quality of life. Walk, dance, garden, golf, go shopping, take the dog for a walk, volunteer, cycle, do your housework, take yoga and Pilates classes, play with your grandchildren, and have sex. Yes sex! It’s great exercise. In winter, you can still keep active by walking in shopping malls, going to your local community centre, or joining a gym.

Seniors who exercise regularly enjoy:

* Improved quality of life
* Vitality
* Prolonged independence
* Increased energy
* Stronger muscles and bones
* Fewer aches and pains
* Better posture
* Reduced risk of falls and injuries, obesity, high blood pressure, stroke, diabetes, osteoporosis, and depression

Exercise is good for all seniors, even those with medical conditions including heart conditions, osteoporosis, and arthritis. Please consult your doctor for a medically recommended exercise program.